Avoiding inappropriate urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)

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Avoiding inappropriate urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)

Yanetsi Alayon

St. Thomas University

NUR 416: Nursing Research & Evidence-Based Practice

Prof. Kathleen Price

May 30th,

Avoiding inappropriate urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)

Urinary tract infection is among the main healthcare-associated infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection tends to account for most of these infections. These infections tend to be the most preventable infections with major cost savings ability. The study aims at reducing the usage of indwelling urinary catheters by minimizing the inappropriate urinary catheterization as well as the duration of catheterization.

This pre-post control intervention study makes use of a number of pre-post control designs using a phased mixed method technique. The research took place in four acute health care facilities in NSW, Australia (Parker et al., 2017) Pint prevalence data was gathered from all age inpatient wards in four health care facilities in two health districts apart from the emergency departments, operation theaters as well as the day only wards.

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections tend to be so expensive, and mostly preventable by minimizing inappropriate urinary catheter use. Multifaceted techniques integrating appropriate practice guidelines with employee engagement, education as well as monitoring have been proved to be efficient methods to aid in avoiding the use of catheters (Meddings et al., 2016). Post-operative intermittent, catheterization minimizes the risk of bacteriuria in comparison to indwelling catheters. In addition, suprapubic, condom drainage, or intermittent catheterization can be used instead of indwelling urethral catheters. Bladder scanners may be used to evaluate and identify urinary retention so as to minimize inappropriate catheterization in the bladder’s ability. Implementation of strategies and clinical practices described above can decrease the incidence of CAUTI and increase the knowledge of novice nurses like myself enriching our daily practice through evidence-based research.

 

References

Meddings J, Rogers M., Krein, S., Fakih, M., Olmsted, R., & Saint, S. (2016). Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review. BMJ Quality & Safety, 23, 277-289.

Parker, V., Giles, M., Graham, L., Suthers, B., Watts, W., O’Brien, T., & Searles, A. (2017). Avoiding inappropriate urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI): A pre-post control intervention study. BMC Health Services Research, 17, 314. doi: 10.1186/s12913-017-2268-2

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